THREE GREAT PRINCIPLES

Brotherly Love:

Every true Freemason will show tolerance and respect for the opinions of others and behave with kindness and understanding to his fellow creatures.

This can be manifested in innumerable opportunities not only in the lodge but also out of it. It is acknowledged by the nearly imperceptible pressure of the hand as much as by the vindication of an innocently accused absent Brother from the throne. It is an essential element to bind the brethren unto each other; we have pledged ourselves to exercise it, and it is one of the greatest duties of a Free and Accepted Mason to deny it unto no Man, more especially to a Brother Mason. To exercise brotherly love, or to feel deeply interested in the welfare of others is a source of the greatest happiness in every situation in life. The king upon his throne would find his situation insupportable if his subjects showed their regard unto him through fear alone and not through love, and so would those also who have a superabundance of worldly possessions. He who does not find his heart warmed with love towards all mankind should never strive to be a Freemason, for he cannot exercise brotherly love. – Gadicke.

Relief:

Freemasons are taught to practice charity and to care – not only for their own – but also for the community as a whole, both by charitable giving and by voluntary efforts and works as individuals.

Relief is an important tenant of our procession; and though to relieve the distressed is a duty incumbent on all men, it is more particularly so on Masons, who are linked together by a indissoluble chain of sincere affection. To soothe calamity, alleviate misfortune, compassionate misery, and restore peace to the troubled mind, is the grand aim of the true Mason. On this basis he establishes his friendships, and informs his connections. – Macoy

Truth:

Freemasons strive for truth, requiring high moral standards and aiming to achieve them in their own lives.

Truth is a divine attribute, and the foundation of every virtue. To be good and true, is the first lesson we are taught in Masonry. On this theme we contemplate, and by its dictates endeavor to regulate our conduct; influenced by this principle, hypocrisy and deceit are unknown in the lodge; sincerity and plain dealing distinguish us, while the heart and tongue join in promoting the general welfare, and rejoicing in each other’s prosperity. – Preston

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